Home » Made in Mans Image: The construction of the Black person in British media text and the ideological implications. by Alan James Thompson
Made in Mans Image: The construction of the Black person in British media text and the ideological implications. Alan James Thompson

Made in Mans Image: The construction of the Black person in British media text and the ideological implications.

Alan James Thompson

Published October 18th 2009
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Made in Man’s Image: The construction of the Black person in British media text and the ideological implications.It seems surprising that in the 21st century at a time of ‘inescapable hybridity’ of culture (Gilroy, 1993:xi) British media has notMoreMade in Man’s Image: The construction of the Black person in British media text and the ideological implications.It seems surprising that in the 21st century at a time of ‘inescapable hybridity’ of culture (Gilroy, 1993:xi) British media has not moved forward in their mental processes about race especially their opinion and textual ideological representation of the Black person. This becomes both critical and dangerously important when considering the last time a repressive state sponsored organisation was allowed to (1) segregate (both physically and ideologically), (2) target and (3) systematically eliminate a race – The German Nazi party against the Jewish race.The British and American media have been vanguards in the negative portrayal of Black people as the works of (Cosby, 1994- Gray, 1995- Hill, 1986- hooks, 1992:3- and Ford, 1997) testify. Indeed hooks stresses that the field of representation remains a place of struggle and most evident when we critically examine contemporary representations of blackness and black people. Here I am not overtly concerned about determining human abilities specific to a race otherwise termed racism although I recognize and argue that without the critical discourse of racism the state would not enjoy such a hegemonic relationship with its other social constituents. Nor am I concerned with the simple bigot or the poor as racists who merely develop a culture of envy and hence require a scapegoat for their resentment. I am concerned with the more serious state sponsored ideological construction of a race where that construction’s sole purpose is to influence the masses against that particular race. The British construction is of course different to the German Nazism model in numerous ways but by no means less intrusive, however the repugnant events that took place against the Jews was gradual and the current events recorded against the blacks is also gradual. Notwithstanding this, it would be inappropriate to claim or indeed accuse the British of being Nazis I cannot substantiate that claim- rather the situation is clearly a new doctrine more a collective amalgamations of Britain’s previous doctrinal incarnations: imperialism, colonialism, neo-colonialism and White supremacism all of which were legitimized with haughtiness in the pursuit of power. The British media does not appear to have learned any lessons from the Nazi media doctrine and the severe destruction caused to a minority race due inter alia, to racialist textual media representation of a minority race within its national borders.The study assumes that the state based in part on racialist ideology, constructs a representation of the Black person in order to ideologically rule the masses, maintain its Anglo Saxon Capitalistic ideals and deflect class conflict. The state I argue, in its construction forms a hegemonic relationship with the masses to accept the status quo and legitimize its status. Indeed the masses accept privileges of power over the black person because of the hegemonic relationship. The Black person suffers in ignorance realizing that something is not quite right but fails to determine the construction because the forms and means escapes them with profound complexity. The overwhelming level of constructed institutionalized racism renders the black person doomed to fail, subordinate and powerless. The Black person therefore surrenders to a hopeless circular matrix of social purgatory , always-controlled always-disillusioned and discontent in ignorance.The work should not only be taken as a wake up call to the black diasporia- the weak, the gay community and the working classes should all note the similarities of state control over suppressed groups.