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Free Will: Standard Argument Against Free Will, Libertarianism, Gaussian Adaptation, Nietzsche and Free Will, Compatibilism and I Books LLC

Free Will: Standard Argument Against Free Will, Libertarianism, Gaussian Adaptation, Nietzsche and Free Will, Compatibilism and I

Books LLC

Published August 29th 2011
ISBN : 9781156996171
Paperback
84 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 82. Chapters: Free will in theology, Free will in antiquity, Neuroscience of free will, Two-stage model of freeMorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 82. Chapters: Free will in theology, Free will in antiquity, Neuroscience of free will, Two-stage model of free will, Libertarianism, Dilemma of determinism, Gaussian adaptation, Do otherwise in the same circumstances, Nietzsche and free will, Life is a Dream, Argument from free will, Alvin Plantingas free will defense, Agency, Choice, Duration, Elbow Room, Dickinson S. Miller, General will, Involuntary memory, Chance, Compatibilism, Velleity, Alternative possibilities, Predeterminism, Self-determination, Hobsons choice, Conscious Robots, Freedom of action, Conscious automatism, Thought identification, Free will theorem, Superficial charm, Mandated choice, Higher-order volition, Voluntariness, Illusionism, Value of control. Excerpt: Free will is the apparent ability of agents to make choices free from certain kinds of constraints. Historically, the constraint of dominant concern has been the metaphysical constraint of determinism. The opposing positions within that debate are metaphysical libertarianism, the claim that determinism is false and thus that free will exists (or is at least possible)- and hard determinism, the claim that determinism is true and thus that free will does not exist. Both of these positions, which agree that causal determination is the relevant factor in the question of free will, are classed as incompatibilists. Those who deny that determinism is relevant are classified as compatibilists, and offer various alternative explanations of what constraints are relevant, such as physical constraints (e.g. chains or imprisonment), social constraints (e.g. threat of punishment or censure), or psychological constraints (e.g. compulsions or phobias). The principle of free will has religious, ethical, and scientific implications. For example, in the religious realm, free will implies that individual will and choic...